When legendary songwriter Linda Perry discovered that Kate Hudson could sing, she enabled the actress’ childhood dream to come true.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, Perry happened to be on a virtual school program during which Hudson sang a rendition of Katy Perry‘s “Firework.” Soon after, Perry called Hudson in for a studio session — and before they knew it, they were creating Hudson’s debut album.

But their interaction was much more serendipity than it was coincidence. And perhaps you could say the same for Hudson’s breakthrough role as the music-obsessed “band-aide” Penny Lane in 2000’s Almost Famous. Music was always Hudson’s first love, now manifested as Glorious — a glittering musical coronation.

Across 12 tracks, Hudson shows off her sultry voice over an array of pop-rock melodies, conjuring the enchanting air of Stevie Nicks and the dynamic vocal power of Sheryl Crow. While some may remember hearing Hudson sing in the 2009 film adaptation of the musical Nine or her short stint as a sassy dance instructor on season 5 of “Glee,” Glorious shows an entirely new side of the actress. She feels right at home as she rocks the soulful opener “Gonna Find Out,” hits you in the heart on the tender ballad “Live Forever,” and surprises with belting power on the soaring title track.  

A musical venture has been on Hudson’s vision board, first recognizing the pop star prowess of Madonna and Belinda Carlisle when she was just 5 years old. That lifelong aspiration has led her to feeling more assured in her debut album than anything she’s done in her career thus far. As she declares, “I’ve never felt more present in something in my life.” 

She’s already felt that synergy on stage, too. Hudson made her performance debut in Los Angeles the day after Glorious lead single, “Talk About Love,” premiered in January; she’s since shocked viewers of “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” and “The Voice” with her prowess (“Who knew Kate Hudson could sing?” one “Voice” fan tweeted). And while her singing career doesn’t mean her acting chapter is closed, she’s ready for a tour: “I can’t wait to actually go out and meet people that I’ve never been able to meet before.”

Below, Hudson details her journey to Glorious in her own words — from letting go of potential criticism, to gaining confidence in her voice (with help from Sia!), to simply enjoying a particularly special life moment.

I would always say no if someone asked me to sing. [Whether] it was a charity [event] or some sort of show, I just always had this thing where I didn’t want to put myself out there like that.

I realized I had a fear of being on stage. And I was like, You know what, I’ve got to just start saying yes. So it started with that — I’m just going to say yes to singing, even if it scares me to death. 

It’s my happy place, singing and writing. The only thing that would have been holding me back was the fear of what people might say about it. And that is, I think, the worst possible thing to do — not make art because you’re afraid of the criticism. 

I’m always writing, but when Linda [Perry] said, “Will you come in and sing this song?” and I did, and then she asked if I wrote music, and she’s like, “We should write together,” that was sort of the beginning of what this album became. Getting in the studio with Linda, we had no expectation, we didn’t know what it was going to be — one song, four songs. It ended up being, like, 20-plus songs.

It was a real passion project, versus being a younger artist, and wanting that to be my number one vocation. So I was able to be more present in the process and with no expectation. It sort of had that domino effect of starting the writing and then really just loving it — becoming kind of all-encompassing. Once you open the floodgates, there’s so much to write about. I can’t wait to get back in the studio already.

I think [my hesitation to sing before] was more about, Why am I singing? I find music so precious that, if I wasn’t ready, ready, ready, I just didn’t want to do it. And it’s kind of my personality too. I was the little girl that wouldn’t do anything unless I felt like I had perfected it and had the confidence to be doing it.

And then COVID [hit]. Honestly, it was like, Okay, I’m not getting any younger. I want music to be a part of my life in a bigger way. I can sort of see myself, as I get older, being more surrounded by music and writing music, and being more immersed in music like that, because I love it so much. 

I was thinking about this the other day — lately, Danny [Fujikawa, Hudson’s musician/actor fiancé] and I write, like, a song a week, and sometimes multiple. I love it, we love doing it together. So it’s something that I can’t wait to, hopefully, be able to do just more of.

The performance thing is so new for me that it’s wild. This past month of performing, and being in front of people, and sharing music, and sharing my voice like that, is something brand new. I call it, like, putting on a new pair of shoes and wearing them in a little bit — going to different places and your voice sounds different in different rooms. 

Trying to really understand what that feels like is so much fun for me, and so interesting, and so exhilarating. But I find that they’re two very different things to love, singing live and writing.

When I was little, I just loved pop stars — like, Madonna, Janet Jackson, Belinda Carlisle. I was also very fashion-forward. My mom always let me wear my own outfits, and sometimes I was so insane. When I was, like, 5, I dressed like I was living out my pop star life. So, I think, the whole thing with music, and fashion, and dancing, that was my dream when I was little.

For a lot of performers — people who like to be [doing] musical theater, love to sing, love to dance — we kind of get into all of it. To me, it’s the performing aspect. I say to my kids, “Do all of it. You need to get into movement. You need to get into voice. You use all of it.” As you see, a lot of great actors are wonderful singers, and love to do musical theater, and started out doing musical theater. Whether it be Leslie Odom Jr., Josh Gad, Annie Hathaway, Amanda Seyfried, Hugh Jackman — a lot of these people are just so musical and have incredible instruments. 

I never focused on the instrument. I never took real vocal classes. I would sing instinctually, but I never was “in voice” or anything like that. When I would get into writing, it’s a little bit of a different thing. Finding that feeling, that energy of, like, what your voice is as a singer/songwriter is a really interesting process. But I’ve kind of secretly been doing that since I was like, 19 in my living room. [Laughs.]

It took me a lot to find confidence in my voice. Because some instruments have bigger range, some instruments are more intricate — and by instruments, I mean voices. And if I was to compare myself [to anyone], I think it would take away from the freedom I feel when I just love to sing. 

Certain people that I admire that I’ve worked with, [have] allowed me to feel more confidence in opening up my voice, being able to really just go for it. Like, working with Sia on Music, the film that we did [in 2021], was huge for me. She really helped me feel more confidence in my big, belting voice.

I’ve always been writing [songs]. It’s always been my outlet for myself, whether I think they’re good or terrible. [Laughs.] I’d say 19 [is when] I picked up guitar, and I always played a little piano when I was younger, but then I got more into piano at like, 20. People always say, “Where’s your happy place?” and I’ve always said, “My piano.” When I’m really sad and depressed, it’s just where I go to get it out. And then the opposite, too — when I’m ready to have fun, it’s my favorite place to be. 

There’s a lot of people that just have a connection to music, love it so much, and don’t know what they would do without it. I find it to be the most connective art form. Large groups of people get to feel something at the same time, together, and have these experiences that, I think, are just so important for the human experience, to be that connected through something.

[When I was filming Almost Famous],I still probably felt like, at some point, I will do music, whether it be in a movie, a musical or in my life. And, to be honest, I’m not a calculated person. I really have never been someone who was like, I’m going to do this and then I’m going to do that, and then I have to do that, and that’s going to look like this. 

I’m such an Aries. I just want to have fun where I’m at. I like being spontaneous, I like being open to things, and I like being present in where I am. So if you took me back there, I was just so happy to be a working actress. I wasn’t thinking, like, Now what?

In reflection, at that time, crossing over [into music] was sort of looked poorly upon— if you’re starting to become successful in one thing, you need to stick to that. You have to understand, like, if someone even did a commercial, the perception of it would be like, “Oh that person’s career is over.”

Now, the world has completely shifted and it just doesn’t matter anymore. Which is such a nice thing for a lot of artists.

At the end of the day, these are art forms that we really care about. It’s really important to us to make the right movies — when you’re creating a character, or when you’re writing an album. People might not see [that] from the outside in. It fuels something that is just like, you couldn’t live without it. 

So when you get to a certain place that you are being known for what you love, for the art form, and you become a celebrity, the criticism is so extreme. It’s so extreme that it’s like, if you feed into it, it will stop you from wanting to take any risks as an artist. You start to become precious about things — you get nervous to step out on a limb because it could destroy things that you’ve been really working hard to build. But the irony of that is, you aren’t really an artist unless you’re taking those chances. 

Entering this phase of my life age-wise, I’ve been through all of that harsh criticism so many times that after a while, you realize like it just doesn’t matter. What matters is that you’re putting your best foot forward, you know?

I’m so happy in my home life. I feel very cozy in my familial unit — my parents, and my brothers, and my partner, and my kids. That allows the safety to feel good putting myself out there like this.

Obviously music is in our life all the time, but [my kids] love it. It’s a very comfortable place for all of us — being on tour, being in all these different stages. It’s just so funny, I think, for them to see me in that position, versus their dad. [Editor’s note: Hudson has three kids; son Ryder with the Black Crowes frontman Chris Robinson, son Bing with Muse singer Matt Belamy, and daughter Rani with Fujikawa.] It’s been really fun for them to watch. At least that’s what they tell me. 

I think what’s really fun for them is to see that the thing that they know that I love, that they’ve been surrounded by their whole life — which is me singing and writing — I think it’s fun for them to actually see that I decided to pursue the thing I love the most.

I’ll never forget the first time [performing live] because I felt like I was surrounded by all of my closest friends and family, and they all know what the process has been for me. So it was very special. 

I’m just so happy singing on stage. I can’t wait to actually go out and meet people that I’ve never been able to meet before and have that connection. I can’t wait to get into like, the weird places in the world, and experience what it feels like to connect with people in Cleveland, or in Kansas City, or Dusseldorf, Germany!

I was reading something about women and imposter syndrome, and how many women feel that way about all of the things that we’ve done — it doesn’t matter what it is. It’s a very popular thing for women to feel when they become successful in something, [that] they don’t really deserve it.

I’ve had that before in my acting career. Those kinds of feelings creep up all the time. I think they do for a lot of women. But, I’m a worker bee. I work really hard, and I put the things out in the world that I feel connected to, and that I hope people love. And if there’s success in it, the only thing that would ever make me feel like I didn’t deserve it would be someone else, not the work I’ve put into it.

And the truth is, I think all artists [are] always striving to be better than how we are right now. I think that’s part of the deal. If you’ve thought, like, Yeah, I’m the best. That’s kind of weird. That’s problematic. For most artists, it’s never enough. You’re always striving to make things better.

I’m old enough, at this point, to have a good sense of what not to worry about. I would love for people to like what I’m doing, it would make me feel so good. But I also know that everyone’s gonna have a different opinion.What I’ve learned the most is put your head down, do good work and have fun — enjoy every moment and don’t overthink it. So that’s kind of what I’m leaning into in this process [with].

I definitely want to make more music. That’s the thing I know, is that no matter where, or what it’s for — whether it’s for musicals, film, television, another album — writing is just something I’m never going to stop doing. I started this with no expectations, and I’ve taken each moment in the moment it presents itself. And I’m gonna stay there.

I’ve never felt more present in something in my life. Even though it’s so crazy right now — I don’t even know what day it is. It’s been a wildly busy time. But having music being a part of my life like this has just been the greatest, cathartic, joyful transition. I don’t ever want that to go away.

I definitely have moments where I wake up and I feel this immense amount of gratitude that I’m getting to share music and that people are hearing it. And the warmth that I’m receiving has felt really special. It does not go unnoticed. 

It’s been the most special moment of my life. So far, it’s been great. I’m sure my sophomore experience will feel very different. [Laughs.] But right now, I’m just having so much fun.

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